Teach With INFOhio

Set Students Up for Success in Storia and Transparent Language Online

Author // Erica Clay Friday, 03 August 2018

Make student learning happen on the first day of school by setting up your Storia classes and Transparent Language Online student accounts now.


Both Storia and Transparent Language Online offer personalized learning features that students will enjoy. In Storia, teachers can monitor student progress and assign eBooks to individual students, groups, or classes. In Transparent Language Online, students can select a language learning path that includes games, speaking and listening exercises, and quizzes. To take advantage of these features, students need individual accounts.

For instructions on how to request an access code and create your teacher account for Storia: Ohio's 4th & 5th Grade eBook Collection, visit our Storia information page. Once you've created your teacher account for Storia, you can create a class and then upload a class list as a CSV file to enroll your students.

While teachers and students ages 16 and up can create personal Transparent Language Online user accounts, students under the age of 16 must have a parent, guardian, or other authorized adult (including a teacher) create a Transparent Language Online user account on their behalf. For instructions on how to create Transparent Language Online accounts for your child, your students, or yourself, visit our Transparent Language Online information page. Users are NOT required to enter an email address to create a Transparent Language Online account.

Questions or comments? Contact us at support.infohio.org.

About the Author

Posted by: Erica Clay

Erica Clay has been a member of INFOhio's Instructional Team since December 2013. She earned a BA in English and Music and a Master of Humanities from Wright State University, and a Master of Library Science from Indiana University. As an ILibrarian, Erica evaluates and selects digital tools and resources aligned with Ohio Learning Standards, and supports integration of those tools and resources into classroom instruction. She also collects, analyzes, and shares INFOhio usage data to inform instructional design, and writes for INFOhio's social media, blog, and news.

Erica Clay